Cambridge

FIVE PLACES REMAINING FOR CB GROUNDWORKS CUP CORPORATE 6-A-SIDE!

Cambridge United News Feed - 7 hours 18 min ago

Commercial

Local companies from across Cambridge have been quick to snap places for the CB Groundworks Cup at the Abbey Stadium, with one night fully sold out and just five places remaining in total.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

SOCCER SCHOOLS IN FULL SWING ACROSS CAMBRIDGE!

Cambridge United News Feed - 10 hours 16 min ago

Community

Cambridge United’s February half-term Soccer Schools are in full swing at four venues across the city and beyond, and there’s still time to sign up your child for the rest of the week!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

MATCH REPORT | CAMBRIDGE UNITED 0 TRANMERE ROVERS 0

Cambridge United News Feed - Sat, 02/16/2019 - 17:45

Match Reports

Cambridge United settled for a share of the spoils against Tranemre Rovers, as a goalless draw extended their unbeaten run at the Abbey Stadium to four games.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

PROGRAMME PREVIEW | TRANMERE ROVERS – DAVID AMOO

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 02/15/2019 - 15:33

Club News

David Amoo speaks to tomorrow’s match day programme as this weekend’s player feature - Read a preview of the Tranmere Rovers programme here!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

ETHOS COMMUNITY HEROES – TRACY HUTCHISON AND PAUL BEASTALL

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 02/15/2019 - 14:36

Community

The Ethos Community Heroes of the day for the U’s Sky Bet League Two match against Tranmere Rovers are Tracy Hutchison and Paul Beastall for their work in setting up parkrun locally in Cambridge.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

INTRODUCING THE 12TH FAN…PHIL GANNON

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 02/15/2019 - 13:15

Club News

Cambridge United are delighted to introduce this Saturday’s 12th Fan and therefore leading the U’s out at the Abbey Stadium against Tranmere Rovers, is Phil Gannon.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

PROGRAMME PREVIEW | COMMUNITY TRUST MATCH DAY!

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 02/15/2019 - 11:35

Community

Cambridge United are pleased to announce tomorrow’s Sky Bet League Two fixture against Tranmere Rovers, will see a Community Trust takeover at the Abbey Stadium.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Darwin’s rabbit helps to explain the fightback against myxomatosis

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Thu, 02/14/2019 - 23:00

Read the story here

Seventy years after myxomatosis decimated the rabbit populations of Australia, Britain and France, a new study led by Cambridge scientists reveals how the species has evolved genetic resistance to the disease through natural selection.

Trustees of the Natural History MuseumRabbit collections at the Natural History Museum, London.


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

DON’T MISS OUR SOCCER SCHOOLS | FULL WEEK BOOKINGS NOW CLOSED AT SELECTED VENUES DUE TO HIGH DEMAND!

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 02/14/2019 - 13:39

Club News

CHECK OUT THE HALF-TERM SCHEDULE

The Soccer Schools are most certainly the place to be this February half-term with all of our venues packed with kids ready to celebrate plenty of exciting footy action during their time off school!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

When real men wore feathers: recreating a Renaissance fashion statement

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Thu, 02/14/2019 - 10:45

Read the story here

Ostrich feathers are often associated with glamorous women but this wasn’t always the case. In the sixteenth century, it was Europe’s men who spearheaded this trend. Now experts in Cambridge and London have brought this forgotten moment in fashion history back to life by recreating a lavish headdress.

Matthäus Schwarz wearing a feather headdress in 1521


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NEW GOURMET MENU PROVES POPULAR ON OPENING WEEKEND – WARM UP WITH A CHILLI OR CURRY AT THE TRANMERE GAME!

Cambridge United News Feed - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 18:38

Club News

Warm up with a tasty Chilli Con Carne or a delicious Thai Green Curry this Saturday, with the new gourmet menu available once again from the Paul Wanless Bar for the Tranmere Rovers clash!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

JOE NEAL SIGNS HIS FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEAL WITH THE U’S

Cambridge United News Feed - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 13:41

Academy

YOUNG STRIKER SIGNS TWO AND A HALF YEAR PROFESSIONAL CONTRACT

Cambridge United are pleased to confirm that Academy product Joe Neal has penned a two and half year professional contract, committing his future to the Abbey Stadium until 2021.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Music and the battle for Granada's past

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 10:50

Read the story here

Concerns over immigration and the rise of the far-right in Spain are fuelling tensions at one of its most important festivals, the Día de la Toma in Granada. And as a new Cambridge study reveals, music has become a key battleground.

Courtesy of Shadowgate under a Creative Commons license.Street performer in Granada.


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Surface lakes cause Antarctic ice shelves to ‘flex’

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 10:00

A team of British and American researchers, co-led by the University of Cambridge, has measured how much the McMurdo ice shelf in Antarctica flexes in response to the filling and draining of meltwater lakes on its surface. This type of flexing had been hypothesised before and simulated by computer models, but this is the first time the phenomenon has been measured in the field. The results are reported in the journal Nature Communications.

The results demonstrate a link between surface melting and the weakening of Antarctic ice shelves and support the idea that recent ice shelf breakup around the Antarctic Peninsula may have been triggered, at least in part, by large amounts of surface meltwater produced in response to atmospheric warming.

As the climate continues to warm, more and more ice shelves may become susceptible to flex, fracture and break up over the coming century.

Most of the Antarctic continent is covered by the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which is up to four kilometres thick and contains enough ice to raise global sea levels by about 58 metres. Over most of the continent and for most of the year, air temperatures are well below zero and the ice surface remains frozen. But around 75% of the ice sheet is fringed by floating ice shelves, which are up to a kilometre thick, mostly below sea level, but with tens of metres of their total height protruding above the water. In the summer months, when air temperatures rise above freezing, the surfaces of these ice shelves are susceptible to melting.

“Surface water on ice shelves has been known about for a long time,” said co-author Dr Ian Willis from Cambridge’s Scott Polar Research Institute. “Over 100 years ago, members of both Shackleton’s Nimrod team and the Northern Party team of Scott’s British Antarctic Expedition mapped and recorded water on the Nansen Ice Shelf, around 300 kilometres from where we did our study on the McMurdo Ice Shelf. For the last few decades, it has also been possible to see widespread surface meltwater forming on many ice shelves each summer from satellite imagery.”

What is not fully known is the extent to which surface water might destabilise an ice shelf, especially in warmer summers when more meltwater is produced. If the slope of the ice shelf is sufficiently steep, the water may flow off the ice shelf to the ocean in large surface rivers, mitigating against any potential instability.

The danger comes if water pools up in surface depressions on the ice shelf to form large lakes. The extra weight of the water will push down on the floating ice, causing it to sink a bit further into the sea. Around the edge of the lake, the ice will flex upwards to compensate. “If the lake then drains, the ice shelf will now flex back, rising up where the lake used to be, sinking down around the edge,” said lead author Dr Alison Banwell, also from SPRI. “It is this filling and draining of lakes that causes the ice shelf to flex, and if the stresses are large enough, fractures might also develop.”

Banwell and co-author Professor Doug MacAyeal from the University of Chicago had previously suggested that the filling and draining of hundreds of lakes might have led to the catastrophic breakup of the Larsen B Ice Shelf 2002 when 3,250 square kilometres of ice was lost in just a few days.

“We had been able to model the rapid disintegration of that ice shelf via our meltwater loading-induced fracture mechanism,” said Banwell. “However, the problem was that no one had actually measured ice shelf flex and fracture in the field, and so we were unable to fully constrain the parameters in our model. That’s partly why we set out to try to measure the process on the McMurdo ice shelf.”

Using helicopters, snow machines and their own two feet, the researchers set up a series of pressure sensors to monitor the rise and fall of water levels in depressions which filled to become lakes, and GPS receivers to measure small vertical movements of the ice shelf.

“It was a lot of work to obtain the data, but they reveal a fascinating story,” said MacAyeal. “Most of the GPS signal is due to the ocean tides, which move the floating ice shelf up and down by several metres twice a day. But when we removed this tidal signal we found some GPS receivers moved down, then up by around one metre over a few weeks whereas others, just a few hundred metres away, hardly moved at all. The ones that moved down then up the most were situated where lakes were filling and draining, and there was relatively little movement away from the lakes. It is this differential vertical motion that shows the ice shelf is flexing. We’d anticipated this result, but it was very nice when we found it.”

The team hope that their work will inspire others to look for evidence of flex and fracture on other ice shelves around Antarctica. Their work will also help in developing ice sheet scale models that could be used to predict the stability of ice shelves in the future and to understand the controls on ice shelf size since they act as buffers against fast-moving ice from the continent. As ice shelves shrink, glaciers and ice streams behind them flow more rapidly to the ocean, contributing to global sea level rise.

The work was funded by the US National Science Foundation, the Leverhulme Trust, NASA, and CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder.

Reference:
Alison F. Banwell et al. ‘Direct Measurements of Ice-Shelf Flexure caused by Surface Meltwater Ponding and Drainage.’ Nature Communications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08522-5

The filling and draining of meltwater lakes has been found to cause a floating Antarctic ice shelf to flex, potentially threatening its stability.

Filling and draining of lakes causes the ice shelf to flex, and if the stresses are large enough, fractures might also developAlison BanwellAlison BanwellSurface lakes on ice sheet


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