Cambridge

INTRODUCING THIS WEEKEND'S 12TH FAN…MATT EARL

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 11/22/2018 - 15:56

Club News

Cambridge United are delighted to introduce this Saturday’s 12th Fan and therefore leading the U’s out at the Abbey Stadium against Bury F.C, is Matt Earl.

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SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS FOR THE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER – DAVE MATTHEW JONES

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 11/22/2018 - 15:31

Club News

Cambridge United would like to remind supporters how they can send any questions or queries regarding the Football Club to be answered in the monthly e-newsletter, the U’s News.

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CHECKATRADE TROPHY | NORTHAMPTON TOWN MATCH CONFIRMED 4TH DECEMBER – K.O. 7:45PM

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 11/22/2018 - 12:16

Club News

Cambridge United can confirm that the Checkatrade Trophy Second Round fixture with Northampton Town at the Abbey Stadium will take place on Tuesday 4th December, kicking off at 7:45pm.

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FISH AND CHIPS SPECIAL IN CLUB CAMBRIDGE FOR NORTHAMPTON TOWN CLASH

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 11/22/2018 - 11:42

Commercial

Checkatrade Trophy Hospitality

Enjoy a fish and chips special in Club Cambridge ahead of the Checkatrade Trophy clash with Northampton Town for just £30, including your match ticket!

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Engineering artistry

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Wed, 11/21/2018 - 15:49

The variety and beauty of engineering are on display in the images featured in the Department of Engineering's annual photo competition, the winners of which were announced today. Click here to see the winners. 

Dr D T L GalhenaScattered Islands


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FA YOUTH CUP |THIRD ROUND MATCH WTH READING CONFIRMED

Cambridge United News Feed - Wed, 11/21/2018 - 13:57

Academy

11/12/18 - K.O. 7:00pm

Cambridge United Under 18s will host category one Academy Reading FC at the Abbey Stadium on Tuesday 11th December, in the Third Round of the 2018/19 FA Youth Cup!

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Cambridge United Power Up with The Energy Check

Cambridge United News Feed - Wed, 11/21/2018 - 11:41

Commercial

Cambridge United are delighted to announce a new partnership, as The Energy Check become ‘The Official Energy Partner’ of the club. The partnership will see The Energy Check logo appear on the front and back of The U’s first team walk out jackets.

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VOTE NOW | ADE AZEEZ UP FOR CHECKATRADE TROPHY PLAYER OF THE ROUND

Cambridge United News Feed - Wed, 11/21/2018 - 11:34

Club News

VOTING CLOSES FRIDAY

Ade Azeez has been nominated for the Checkatrade Trophy player of the round AND YOU CAN VOTE NOW!

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How Churchill Waged War

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Wed, 11/21/2018 - 09:24

Read our full Shorthand story here.

A newly-published book by Churchill Archives Centre Director Allen Packwood illuminates the agonising decisions faced by the Prime Minister during some of the darkest and most uncertain moments of the Second World War.

Imperial War Museum


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Top ten universities for animal research announced

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Tue, 11/20/2018 - 11:53

The figures show that the ten institutions collectively conducted over one third of all UK animal research in 2017. All ten universities appear in the QS 2018 World University Ranking Top 200 and seven appear in the Top 50.

The top ten institutions conducted 1.32 million procedures, 35% of the 3.79 million procedures conducted in Great Britain in 2017. Over 99% of these procedures were carried out on rodents or fish, and in line with national data they were almost evenly split between experimental work and the breeding of genetically modified animals.

The ten universities are listed below alongside the total number of procedures that they carried out in 2017. Each institution’s name links to its animal research webpage which includes more detailed statistics. This is the third year in a row universities have come together to publicise their collective numbers and examples of their research.

Institution Number of Procedures University of Oxford 236,429 University of Edinburgh 225,366 University College London 214,570 University of Cambridge 157,975 King’s College London 121,741 University of Manchester 104,863 University of Sheffield 83,300 Imperial College London 79,492 Cardiff University 46,743 University of Glasgow 46,045 TOTAL  1,316,524

All universities are committed to the ‘3Rs’ of replacement, reduction and refinement. This means avoiding or replacing the use of animals where possible; minimising the number of animals used per experiment and optimising the experience of the animals to improve animal welfare. However, as universities expand and conduct more research, the total number of animals used can rise even if fewer animals are used per study.

All ten universities are signatories to the Concordat on Openness on Animal Research in the UK, a commitment to be more open about the use of animals in scientific, medical and veterinary research in the UK. Over 120 organisations have signed the concordat including UK universities, charities, research funders and commercial research organisations.

Wendy Jarrett, Chief Executive of Understanding Animal Research, which developed the Concordat on Openness, said: “The Concordat has fostered a culture of openness at research institutions up and down the country. Institutions now provide an unprecedented level of information about how and why they conduct medical, veterinary and scientific research using animals. Almost two-thirds of the university Concordat signatories provide their animal numbers openly on their websites – accounting for almost 90% of all animal research at UK universities."

Animal research at Cambridge

The University of Cambridge has received two Openness Awards for its films about animal research. The first, Fighting Cancer, was a behind-the-scenes tour of one of its animal facilities, explaining how mice are used to study cancer and featuring images of mice with tumours and undergoing procedures. Its second film, Understanding the OCD Brain, looked at how both animal and human studies are vital to exploring a distressing mental health condition and included footage of its marmoset facility. Researchers from the University regularly speak about their work at its annual Science Festival.

“Animals are used in research at the University of Cambridge in a wide variety of experiments designed to develop new treatments for humans and animals," says Dr Martin Vinnell, Director of University Biomedical Services at the University of Cambridge. "However, as seen from the additional data collection undertaken for the first time in 2018 just under 17% of the animals used at Cambridge were used in scientific procedures which did not required a Home Office licence – instead these animals were humanely killed and by applying new and often cutting edge technologies their cells and tissues were used in experiments.”

Find out more about animal research at Cambridge

Adapted from a press release by Understanding Animal Research

Understanding Animal Research, an organisation promoting greater openness about animal research, has today released a list of the ten universities in the UK that conduct the highest number of animal procedures – those used in medical, veterinary and scientific research. These statistics are freely available on the universities’ websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness.

Maggie Bartlett, NHGRIKnockout Mice


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How could multilingualism benefit India’s poorest schoolchildren?

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Tue, 11/20/2018 - 09:00

The crowded and bustling streets of Delhi teem with life. Stop to listen and, above the din of rickshaws, taxis and buses, you’ll hear a multitude of languages, as more than 20 million men, women and children go about their daily lives.

Many were born and raised there, and many millions more have made India’s capital their home, having moved from surrounding neighbourhoods, cities and states or across the country, often in search of a better job, a better home and a better life.

Some arrive speaking fluent Hindi, the dominant language in Delhi (and the official language of government), but many arrive speaking any number of India’s 22 officially recognised languages, let alone the hundreds of regional and tribal languages in a country of more than 1.3 billion people.

Around 950 miles south of Delhi lies Hyderabad, where more than 70% of its seven million people speak Telugu. Meanwhile, in Bihar, in the northeast of India, Urdu has replaced Hindi as the dominant language across this poor and populous state of more than 100 million people.

What links Delhi, Hyderabad and Bihar is a four-year project, Multilingualism and multiliteracy: raising learning outcomes in challenging contexts in primary schools across India, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and the Department for International Development. Led by Professor Ianthi Tsimpli, from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics, the project involves Dr Dénes Szucs from the Department of Psychology, plus researchers from the University of Reading and project partners in Karnataka, Hyderabad and New Delhi.

The overriding aim of the project is to find out why in a country where multilingualism is so common (more than 255 million people in India speak at least two languages, and nearly 90 million speak three or more languages), the benefits and advantages of speaking more than one language, observed in Europe for instance, do not apply to many of India’s schoolchildren.

For Tsimpli, the answers to this conundrum may lie within the dataset she and her colleagues are compiling with the help of more than 1,000 primary-age schoolchildren across Delhi, Hyderabad and Bihar.

“Each year across India, 600,000 children are tested, and year after year more than half of children in Standard 5 [ten-year-olds] cannot read a Standard 2 [seven-year-olds] task fluently, and nearly half of them could not solve a Standard 2 subtraction task,” says Tsimpli, who co-leads Cambridge Language Sciences, the University’s Interdisciplinary Research Centre that brings together researchers from different fields to tackle ‘grand challenges’ where language is a factor.

“Low literacy and numeracy limit other important capabilities, including critical thinking and problem solving. Low educational achievement can lead to many dropping out of school – a problem disproportionately affecting female students. And the gap between state schools and private schools increases every year.”

She and colleagues are looking at whether these low learning outcomes could be a by-product of an Indian school system whereby the language that children are taught in often differs from the language used at home.

“We are looking at eight to 11-year-old schoolchildren in rural and urban areas,” she explains. “Within those urban areas we make the distinction between boys and girls living in slum and non-slum areas.

“Many children are internal migrants who move from remote, rural areas to urban areas. They are so poor they have to live in slums and, as a result of migration, these children may speak languages that are different to the regional language.

“By looking at the mismatch between home and school languages, and by using tests and other socio-economic and educational variables, we try to find out whether these children are advantaged or disadvantaged in literacy, numeracy, mathematical reasoning, problem solving and cognitive skills.”

Two years into the four-year project, the team has discovered considerable variation in the provision of education across government schools in the three areas, with different teaching practices and standards.

Having tested all 1,000 children, they will now embark on retesting them, looking not only at test results, but also allowing for other variables such as the standard of schooling, the environment and the teaching practices themselves. It’s possible that one of the causes of low performance is the lack of pupil-centred teaching methods; instead, the teacher dominates and there is little room for independent learning.

Although the findings are at a preliminary stage, Tsimpli and her team have found that the medium of instruction used in schools, especially English, may hold back those children who have little familiarity with, or exposure to,the language before starting school and outside of school life.

“Most of the evidence from this and other projects shows that English instruction in very disadvantaged areas might not be the best way to start, at least in the first three years [Standards 1 to 3] of primary,” says Tsimpli.

“What we would recommend for everyone, not just low socio-economic status children, would be to start learning in the language they feel comfortable learning in. The medium of instruction should reflect the strengths of the child. When it does, that child will learn better. English can still be used, but perhaps not as the medium of instruction in primary schools. It could, for example, be one of the subjects that are being taught alongside other subjects, starting perhaps from the third year of primary school.

“We are not suggesting that English be withdrawn – that ship has sailed – but we perhaps have to think more about learner needs. There is perhaps too much uniformity in teaching and less tailoring to the children’s language abilities and needs.”

While the preliminary results show that there is no difference in general intelligence among boys and girls from slum versus urban poor backgrounds, a surprising finding has been that children from slum backgrounds in Delhi do not seem to lag behind other children from other urban poor backgrounds – and in some cases perform better (e.g. in numeracy and literacy tasks).

This unexpected finding may be down to the life experiences of children growing up in slums, where they are likely to mature faster and come into closer contact with the numeracy skills essential for day-to-day survival.

Tsimpli adds that, despite the project only being at its midpoint, it has already caught the attention of government ministers, including Delhi’s Minister for Education, who is keen to use their findings to inform and adjust school policy in India’s capital city and the wider state.

“Delhi may be keen to adopt root-and-branch reform if our findings support it,” explains Tsimpli. “They are as keen as us to understand how the challenging context of deprivation can be attenuated when focusing on the languages children learn and use while at school.

“Our findings don’t mean that you’re doomed if you’re poor. It may be that these low learning outcomes are because of the way education is provided in India, with a huge focus on Hindi and English as the mediums of instruction, to the potential detriment of children unfamiliar with those languages.

“Language is central to the way knowledge is transferred – so the medium of instruction is obviously hugely influential. We hope to be able to show that problem solving, numeracy and literacy can and do improve in children who are educated in a language of instruction that they know. The trick may be to bridge school skills with life skills and make use of the richness of a child’s life experience to help them learn in the most effective ways possible.”

Inset image: credit Ianthi Tsimpli.

Read more about our research on the topic of children in the University's research magazine; download a pdf; view on Issuu.

 

Multilingualism is the norm in India. But rather than enjoying the cognitive and learning advantages seen in multilingual children in the Global North, Indian children show low levels of learning basic school skills. Professor Ianthi Tsimpli is trying to disentangle the causes of this paradox.

The trick may be to bridge school skills with life skills and make use of the richness of a child’s life experience to help them learn in the most effective ways possibleIanthi TsimpliIanthi TsimpliOne of the partner schoolsResearch partnership

Co-Investigators (India)
National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Karnataka (Prof. Suvarna Alladi); The English & Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad (Dr Lina Mukhopadhyay); Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (Prof. Minati Panda)

Co-Investigators (UK)
University of Cambridge (Dr Dénes Szucs); University of Reading (Prof. Theodore Marinis and Prof. Jeanine Treffers-Daller)

Project partners
British Council, India
Language and Learning Foundation (India)
Bilingualism Matters (UK)
Quest for Learning (UK)
The Communication Trust (UK)

Funding
ESRC Research Grant Number:  ES/N010345/1


The text in this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Images, including our videos, are Copyright ©University of Cambridge and licensors/contributors as identified.  All rights reserved. We make our image and video content available in a number of ways – as here, on our main website under its Terms and conditions, and on a range of channels including social media that permit your use and sharing of our content under their respective Terms.

YesRelated Links: Multilingualism and multiliteracy: raising learning outcomes in challenging contexts in primary schools across India,Cambridge Language Sciences
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CONSULTATION ON CAMBRIDGE UNITED FANS' PARLIAMENT STARTS

Cambridge United News Feed - Tue, 11/20/2018 - 08:00

Club News

Cambridge Fans United (CFU) and Cambridge United F.C today kicked off a consultation with fans and other football clubs on the potential for a Fans' Parliament at the Abbey Stadium.

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THE 100 CLUB | HALF-SEASON MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE FOR CAMBRIDGE UNITED BUSINESS CLUB

Cambridge United News Feed - Mon, 11/19/2018 - 15:42

Commercial

Cambridge United launch half season memberships for the U’s business and networking club – The 100 Club.

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OLDHAM RESULT “TOUGH TO TAKE” SAYS TAFT

Cambridge United News Feed - Mon, 11/19/2018 - 14:36

Club News

George Taft was honest in his assessment of Cambridge United’s defeat at Oldham Athletic on Saturday, as the U’s saw a winning position snatched away from them by the Latics.

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HOME TICKETS | BURY

Cambridge United News Feed - Mon, 11/19/2018 - 11:31

Ticket News

The U’s are back at the Abbey this Saturday as they host Bury F.C in Sky Bet League Two (K.O. 3:00pm), aiming to secure their fourth straight home win.

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MATCH REPORT | OLDHAM ATHLETIC 3 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 1

Cambridge United News Feed - Sat, 11/17/2018 - 16:48

Match Reports

Cambridge United’s winning run in Sky Bet League Two came to an end with a 3-1 defeat at Oldham Athletic, despite George Maris’ wonderful strike earning the U’s an early lead.

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ACADEMY | JIMMY UNWIN & TOM PELL - FA YOUTH CUP

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 11/16/2018 - 16:35

Academy

Academy Manager Tom Pell and Professional Phase Lead Coach Jimmy Unwin discuss Cambridge United Under 18s progression in the FA Youth Cup.

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PLAYER PREVIEW | MARIS ON U’S ABILITY TO TOUGH IT OUT

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 11/16/2018 - 16:29

Club News

As the U’s return to Sky Bet League Two action on Saturday, George Maris reflects positively on the team’s ability to grind out the results in their more recent league fixtures which has seen them moving upwards.

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U’S DRAWN HOME TO NORTHAMPTON TOWN IN CHECKATRADE TROPHY SECOND ROUND

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 11/16/2018 - 13:24

Club News

Cambridge United have been drawn a home tie against Northampton Town in the second Round of the Checkatrade Trophy.

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