Cambridgeshire

PRE-SEASON | LEICESTER CITY AND IPSWICH TOWN TICKETS ON SALE

Cambridge United News Feed - 3 hours 59 min ago

Ticket News

Tickets are now on sale for Cambridge United’s two pre-season home friendlies against Leicester City and Ipswich Town at the Abbey Stadium next month.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

NEXT CHAPTER | NEW KITS SMASH THROUGH RECORD PRE-SALES

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 06/14/2019 - 12:02

Club News

Cambridge United fans have responded to the Club’s exciting new kit designs for the 2019/20 season – smashing pre-sale records at the U’s club shop!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

HOSPITALITY OFFERINGS | 2019/20 SEASON

Cambridge United News Feed - Fri, 06/14/2019 - 11:13

Commercial

Cambridge United are delighted to announce our hospitality offerings within the 8build Executive Hospitality Lounge and Club Cambridge in the Premier Travel Hospitality Suite for the 2019/20 Sky Bet League Two season.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Half of Ebola outbreaks go undetected, study finds

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Fri, 06/14/2019 - 10:00
The research, led by Emma Glennon from Cambridge’s Department of Veterinary Medicine, is the first to estimate the number of undetected Ebola outbreaks. Although these tend to involve clusters of fewer than five people, they could represent well over one hundred patient cases in total.   The study, published today in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, found that the chance of detecting an isolated case of Ebola was less than 10%.   Glennon, a Gates Cambridge Scholar, says: “Most times that Ebola has jumped from wildlife to people, this spillover event hasn’t been detected. Often these initial cases don’t infect anyone else but being able to find and control them locally is crucial because you never know which of these events will grow into full outbreaks.”   "We rarely find Ebola outbreaks while they are still easy to manage. The unfolding epidemic in the DRC demonstrates how difficult it is to stop the disease once it has got out of control, even with international intervention. But if an outbreak is detected early enough, we can prevent it spreading with targeted, low-tech interventions, such as isolating infected people and their contacts.”   The scientists used three independent datasets from the 2013–16 Ebola epidemic in West Africa to simulate thousands of outbreaks. From these simulations, they worked out how often they would expect a spillover event to fizzle out early versus how often they would expect to see it progress into a true outbreak. This allowed the team to draw comparisons with reported outbreak sizes and estimate detection rates of clusters of different sizes.   Glennon says: “Most doctors and public health workers have never seen a single Ebola case and severe fever can easily be misdiagnosed as the symptom of malaria, typhoid or yellow fever. To limit outbreaks at their source, we need to invest much more to increase local capacity to diagnose and contain Ebola and these more common fevers.   "We must make sure every local clinic has basic public health and infection control resources. International outbreak responses are important but they are often slow, complicated and expensive.”     Reference: Glennon, E.E., Jephcott, F.L., Restif, O., Wood, J.L.N. ‘Estimating undetected Ebola spillovers’. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases (2019). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0007428

Half of Ebola outbreaks have gone undetected since the virus was discovered in 1976, scientists at the University of Cambridge estimate. The new findings come amid rising concern about Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and highlight the need for improved detection and rapid response to avoid future epidemics.

We rarely find Ebola outbreaks while they are still easy to manageEmma GlennonUN Photo/Martine PerretBurial team in Guinea carry a victim of Ebola, 2015.Funding

Gates-Cambridge Trust (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation [OPP1144]), the ALBORADA Trust, the Medical Research Council (MR/P025226/1).


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Ian Darler - Life's a Pitch

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 06/13/2019 - 16:22

Club News

Cambridge United Head Groundsman and Stadium Manager Ian Darler releases his book ‘Life’s a Pitch” very soon – recollecting the highs and lows of his 40 years so far at the Abbey Stadium.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

MATCH SPONSORSHIPS AT CAMBRIDGE UNITED IN 2019/20

Cambridge United News Feed - Thu, 06/13/2019 - 11:53

Commercial

Match Sponsorship with Cambridge United during the 2019/20 season, is an ideal opportunity to highlight your company’s brand whilst delivering a day to remember for staff, customers and clients.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

CAMBRIDGE UNITED LAUNCH 2019/20 COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITIES BROCHURE

Cambridge United News Feed - Wed, 06/12/2019 - 15:54

Commercial

Hospitality Packages for 2019/20 announced

Cambridge United are delighted to today launch the new Commercial Opportunities Brochure for 2019/20, highlighting the match day sponsorship packages and hospitality offerings available with the U’s next season!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Parents’ lenient attitudes towards drinking linked to greater alcohol use among children

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Wed, 06/12/2019 - 00:49

Alcohol use is one of the biggest risk factors for social and physical harm and has been linked to the development of diseases including cancer, diabetes, and liver and heart disease.

Even though the legal age to buy alcohol is 18 years and above in most countries, the 2015 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs found that almost half of 15–16-year-old students had consumed alcohol and 8% had been drunk by the age of 13.

Exposure to alcohol starts from an early age: children as young as two years old become aware of alcohol and are able to distinguish alcoholic from non-alcoholic drinks. From age four on, children start to understand that alcohol is usually restricted to adults and consumed in specific situations. Many studies have connected the parent’s behaviour and the home environment with children’s alcohol use, but it is still unclear how parental attitudes influence their children’s behaviour.

In a study published today in the journal Addiction, Mariliis Tael-Oeren and colleagues at Cambridge’s Behavioural Science Group and the School of Health Sciences at the University of East Anglia (UEA) found that children whose parents had less restrictive attitudes towards their child’s alcohol use were more likely to start drinking alcohol than their peers. They also drank – and got drunk – more frequently.

The findings come from a review of published articles examining parent-child pairs and the relationship between parental attitudes and their child’s alcohol use. A review enables researchers to combine data from a large number of studies, sometimes with conflicting findings, to arrive at a more robust finding. The researchers pooled information from the 29 most relevant articles and analysed all the relevant information, which included data from almost 16,500 children and more than 15,000 parents in the US and Europe.

Mariliis Tael-Oeren, PhD student and lead author for the study, says: “Our study suggests that when parents have a lenient attitude towards their children drinking alcohol, this can lead to their child drinking more frequently – and drinking too much.

“Although the data was based on children and their parents in the US and Europe, we expect that our findings will also apply here in the UK.”

Ms Tael-Oeren and colleagues also found a mismatch between what children think is their parent’s attitude towards them drinking and what the parent’s attitude actually is. Children were no more likely to start drinking alcohol if they perceived their parent to have a lenient attitude, but once they had started drinking, they were more likely to drink often.

“This mismatch doesn’t mean that children perceive parental attitudes completely differently from their parents,” explains Ms Tael-Oeren. “Instead, it could be that their perceptions are skewed towards thinking their parents have more lenient attitudes. This could be because their parents haven’t expressed their attitudes in a way that the children really understand.”

“Alcohol use can be problematic, particularly among young people. It’s important that children understand the short and long term consequences of drinking. If parents don’t want their children to drink, then our study suggests they need to be clear about the message they give out.”

Senior author Professor Stephen Sutton says that social norms could lead to confusion among children. “Alcohol use is influenced by a variety of factors, including attitudes and social norms. If the social norm supports parents introducing alcohol to children, children might mistakenly assume that their parents are more lenient, even when this is not the case.”

Dr Felix Naughton, from UEA’s School of Health Sciences, adds: “Uncovering this mismatch in perceptions is important as it may have implications for parenting programmes designed to support families in reducing childhood alcohol use and indeed for parents who just want to know what they can do to protect their children.”

The study was funded by the Archimedes Foundation.

Reference
M Tael-Öeren, F Naughton, S Sutton. The relationship between parental attitudes and children’s alcohol use: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Addiction; 12 June 2019; DOI: 10.1111/add.14615

Children are more likely to start drinking alcohol, drink more frequently and get drunk if their parents have a lenient attitude towards drinking, finds a study from researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of East Anglia.

Our study suggests that when parents have a lenient attitude towards their children drinking alcohol, this can lead to their child drinking more frequently – and drinking too muchMariliis Tael-OerenCarlos Blanco (Unsplash)BeerResearcher profile: Mariliis Tael-Oeren

There are three places you’re likely to find PhD student Mariliis Tael-Oeren: at the Cambridge Institute of Public Health, doing statistical analysis and writing; in the park, reading scientific articles; and “in mysterious dungeons fighting fierce dragons”.

The latter, of course, is only in the world of board games, where Mariliis enjoys immersing herself at weekends. Her day job, however, is focused on tackling a different type of demon: underage alcohol use.

Originally from Estonia, where she studied Applied Chemistry and Biotechnology before gaining a Master’s in Public Health, Mariliis is now studying for a PhD in Cambridge. Her research project examines a parent-oriented alcohol use prevention programme that was carried out in Estonia.

“The aim of the programme was to delay the onset of – and reduce – alcohol use among young people. Although the programme was not effective in doing that, I find it very important to understand why it failed. I find this part of the research very interesting – in a way it is like a puzzle to solve.

“Listening to the stories of those parents on the programme and getting their feedback was very empowering. You understand that you are doing good, making the world a better place.”

Mariliis hopes her work will provide input to other researchers who are working in the field of substance use prevention field and additional knowledge to use when implementing intervention programmes. The greater aim, she says, is to see that alcohol use rates among children are declining.


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Value of manufacturing to UK economy significantly underestimated, report claims

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Wed, 06/12/2019 - 00:00

In the context of Brexit, the authors say it is vital that UK negotiators seeking new trade agreements are equipped with a solid understanding of manufacturing’s importance to the economy.

The report, ‘Inside the Black Box of Manufacturing’ by Dr Jostein Hauge and Dr Eoin O’Sullivan from Cambridge’s Institute for Manufacturing, was carried out for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS). The authors say that the current value placed on manufacturing activity is based on outdated and inaccurate methods of counting and that the economic value of manufactured goods increasingly depends on activities that are officially categorised as belonging to other sectors of the economy.

“It is essential that policymakers have accurate information on the size of manufacturing sectors in order to develop internationally competitive industrial strategy,” said O’Sullivan. “In particular, policymakers need to be able to measure manufacturing in a way that better reflects how firms actually organise themselves into value networks.”

“An implication of our study is that if the way manufacturing-related activities are counted does not change, the UK could be missing significant opportunities to build world-leading industries,” said Hauge. “It is also critical that post-Brexit international trade negotiators are equipped with a more accurate understanding of the value of these industries and in particular the potential economic impact of companies moving manufacturing operations away from the UK.”

The report discusses how manufacturing is defined, and what activities are currently included or excluded from how it is counted in the economy, highlighting why its value is being underestimated.

The manufacturing sector plays a significant role in the UK economy. As measured in the national accounts, it provides over 2.7 million jobs, makes up 49% of UK exports, and contributes 66% of all UK R&D business expenditure. However, manufacturing’s contribution to the UK economy – about 9% of GDP – may seem dwarfed by services, which make up 70% of UK GDP.

But according to the report, this is misleading. Manufacturing may in fact be significantly higher in economic contribution and underestimating it could have serious implications for national decision-making.

“It is essential that we properly understand the size and nature of the UK manufacturing sector as well as the value of industries to the UK in order to develop an internationally competitive industrial strategy,” said Clare Porter, Head of Manufacturing the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. “Official statistics do not provide the full picture of the role of UK manufacturing in supporting national economic competitiveness and growth. In particular, the official manufacturing statistics do not include the additional value added or jobs generated by services across manufacturing value chains. Many of these services would not thrive, or even exist, without UK-based manufacturing. In fact, many of these services, in particular, technical and professional ones, require deep knowledge and sophisticated capabilities related to the manufacturing activities they support.”

The report explains that the current system of industry classification is out of date, and a range of manufacturing-related services are excluded from the manufacturing category. These are mostly technical services that require sector-specific technical knowhow, like R&D, industrial design, analysis, and testing. Additionally, there are professional service providers in areas such as intellectual property and consultancy that are increasingly tailoring their needs to specific manufacturing industries.

“This report is a clarion call for politicians of all parties to update their understanding and recognise the central importance of manufacturing not only to local regions but to the wider UK economy as well,” said Seamus Nevin, Chief Economist at Make UK. “An increasingly outdated understanding of what modern manufacturing actually is means policymakers have neglected the sector in the misguided belief that services, not manufacturing, is where the future potential for innovation and productivity growth lies. The Government has set out a modern industrial strategy which will be at the centre of the UK economy post-Brexit.

“It is now essential that there is cross-party support to deliver on this to ensure we meet the new technological challenges of digitisation, as well as the societal challenges to which manufacturing, science and engineering will be at the heart of solving.”

 

The economic value of manufacturing to the UK is being underestimated in official statistics, potentially by as much as half, presenting significant issues for policymakers, according to a new report from the University of Cambridge.

If the way manufacturing-related activities are counted does not change, the UK could be missing significant opportunities to build world-leading industriesJostein HaugePhoto by Louis Reed on UnsplashClose up of production facility


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Cause of hardening of the arteries – and potential treatment – identified

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Tue, 06/11/2019 - 16:00

The team, led by the University of Cambridge and King’s College London, found that a molecule once thought only to exist inside cells for the purpose of repairing DNA is also responsible for hardening of the arteries, which is associated with dementia, heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke.

There is no current treatment for hardening of the arteries, which is caused by build-up of bone-like calcium deposits, stiffening the arteries and restricting blood flow to organs and tissues.

Supported by funding from the British Heart Foundation, the researchers found that poly(ADP ribose), or PAR, a molecule normally associated with DNA repair, also drives the bone-like calcification of arteries.

Additionally, using rats with chronic kidney disease, the researchers found that minocycline – a widely-prescribed antibiotic often used to treat acne – could treat hardening of the arteries by preventing the build-up of calcium in the circulatory system. The study, the result of more than a decade of fundamental research, is published in the journal Cell Reports.

“Artery hardening happens to everyone as they age, and is accelerated in patients on dialysis, where even children develop calcified arteries. But up until now we haven’t known what controls this process and therefore how to treat it,” said Professor Melinda Duer from Cambridge’s Department of Chemistry, who co-led the research as part of a long-term collaboration with Professor Cathy Shanahan from King’s College London.

“This hardening, or biomineralisation, is essential for the production of bone, but in arteries it underlies a lot of cardiovascular disease and other diseases associated with ageing like dementia,” said Shanahan. “We wanted to find out what triggers the formation of calcium phosphate crystals, and why it seems to be concentrated around the collagen and elastin which makes up much of the artery wall.”

In earlier research, Duer and Shanahan had shown that PAR – normally associated with the repair of DNA inside the cell – can in fact exist outside the cell and is the engine of bone production. This led the researchers to hypothesise that PAR may also play a role in biomineralisation. In addition, PARP1 and PARP2, the dominant PAR-producing enzymes, are expressed in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress, processes which are associated with both bone and vascular calcification.

“We could see signals from bone that we couldn’t explain, so we looked for molecules from first principles to figure it out,” said Duer.

“I’d been thinking for years that hardening of the arteries was linked to DNA damage, and that DNA damage is a pathway switched on by many agents including smoking and lipids,” said Shanahan. “When this pathway is switched on, it drives the pathologies associated with ageing. If enough damage is present, the arteries will eventually reflect it.”

Using NMR spectroscopy, the researchers found that when the cells become stressed and die, they release PAR, which binds very strongly to calcium ions. Once released, the PAR starts mopping up calcium into larger droplets which stick onto the components in artery walls that give the artery its elasticity, where they form ordered crystals and solidify, hardening the arteries.

“We never would have predicted that it was caused by PAR,” said Duer. “It was initially an accidental discovery, but we followed it up - and it’s led to a potential therapy.”

Having discovered the links between DNA damage, PAR, bone and artery calcification, the researchers then looked into a way of blocking this pathway through the use of a PARP inhibitor.

“We had to find an existing molecule that is cheap and safe, otherwise, it would be decades before we would get a treatment,” said Shanahan. “If something has already been shown to be safe in humans, the journey to the clinic can be much faster.”

Working together with Cycle Pharmaceuticals, a Cambridge-based company, the researchers identified six known molecules that they thought might inhibit the PARP enzymes. Detailed experiments with these showed that the antibiotic minocycline was highly effective in preventing hardening of the arteries.

“It’s been 12 years of basic research to get to this point,” said Duer. “We set out with absolutely no expectation of finding a potential treatment – there is no treatment currently and nobody would have believed us if we had said at that point we were going to cure hardening of the arteries.”

The technology has been patented and has been licensed to Cycle Pharmaceuticals by Cambridge Enterprise, the University’s commercialisation arm. The researchers are hoping to carry out a proof of principle trial in patients in the next 12 to 18 months.

“Blood vessel calcification is a well-known risk factor for several heart and circulatory diseases, and can lead to high blood pressure and ultimately, a life-threatening heart attack,” said Professor Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation. “Now, researchers have shown how calcification of the walls of blood vessels takes place, and how the process differs from normal bone formation. By doing so, they have been able to identify a potential treatment to reduce blood vessel calcification without any adverse effects on bone. This type of treatment would benefit many people, and we eagerly await the results of the anticipated clinical trials looking at whether this drug lives up to its early promise.”

Reference:
Karin H. Müller et al. ‘Poly(ADP ribose) links the DNA damage response and biomineralization.’ Cell Reports (2019). DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.05.038

 

A team of UK scientists have identified the mechanism behind hardening of the arteries, and shown in animal studies that a generic medication normally used to treat acne could be an effective treatment for the condition.

Artery hardening happens to everyone as they age...but up until now we haven’t known what controls this process and therefore how to treat itMelinda DuerMelinda DuerFalse colour image of calcium phosphate deposits on bone


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Cambridge and Tsinghua sign joint research initiative

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Tue, 06/11/2019 - 14:37

Climate change, food security, chronic disease and other global challenges all require the kind of scientific advances that can only be vastly accelerated by combining the research capacity and intellectual power of global research universities.

Tsinghua and Cambridge have a long history of collaboration in the United Kingdom and China. This new strategic research agreement will deepen our relationship and help us scale up our efforts to address real global issues.

Tsinghua created a £200 million Bio-Innovation centre at the Trinity College-owned Cambridge Science Park last year. The University of Cambridge and Tsinghua have shared an engineering forum since 2013 and there are many other active academic research collaborations in areas such as advanced materials, nuclear engineering or energy and climate policy.

"By focusing on the grand challenges faced by our global communities, such as climate change and emerging technologies, I believe our collaboration will be a powerful engine to drive the academic fusion and synergetic developments between China and UK, as well as with global academic communities,” Tsinghua University Vice-President of Research Professor You Zheng said.

The University of Cambridge is dedicated to seeking out collaborations wherever they offer the prospect of bolstering its mission to contribute to society through the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. 

“We are delighted to enter into this joint research initiative with Tsinghua University which will provide increased momentum to the many existing collaborations between academics at the two universities and provide a framework for setting up new research collaborations in areas of mutual interest,” University of Cambridge Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Institutional and International Relations Professor Eilis Ferran said.

The University of Cambridge and Tsinghua University signed a joint research initiative on Monday as part of efforts by both universities to tackle the urgent challenges faced by humanity.

We are delighted to enter into this joint research initiative with Tsinghua UniversityCambridge Pro-Vice-Chancellor Professor Eilis Ferran


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

MATCH DAY STEWARDS REQUIRED

Cambridge United News Feed - Tue, 06/11/2019 - 10:30

Club News

Cambridge United are looking for hardworking and reliable match day stewards, ensuring customer service standards are delivered and maintained at all times in and around the stadium on match day.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Past climate change pushed birds from the northern hemisphere to the tropics

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Mon, 06/10/2019 - 20:00

The researchers, from the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, applied climate and ecological modelling to illustrate how the distribution of major bird groups is linked to climate change over millions of years. However, while past climate change often occurred slowly enough to allow species to adapt or shift habitats, current rates of climate change may be too fast for many species, putting them at risk of extinction. The results are reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Palaeontologists have documented long-term links between climate and the geographic distributions of major bird groups, but the computer models needed to quantify this link had not been applied to this question until now,” said Dr Daniel Field from Cambridge’s Department of Earth Sciences, the paper’s co-lead author.

For the current study, the researchers looked at ten bird groups currently limited to the tropics, predominantly in areas that were once part of the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana (Africa, South America and Australasia). However, early fossil representatives of each of these groups have been found on northern continents, well outside their current ranges.

For example, one such group, the turacos (‘banana eaters’) are fruit-eating birds which are only found in the forests and savannahs of sub-Saharan Africa, but fossils of an early turaco relative have been found in modern-day Wyoming, in the northern United States.

Today, Wyoming is much too cold for turacos for most of the year, but during the early Palaeogene period, which began with the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs 66 million years ago, the Earth was much warmer. Over time, global climates have cooled considerably, and the ancestors of modern turacos gradually shifted their range to more suitable areas.

“We modelled the habitable area for each group of birds and found that their estimated habitable ranges in the past were very different from their geographic distributions today, in all cases shifting towards the equator over geological time,” said Dr Erin Saupe from the University of Oxford, the paper’s other lead author.

Saupe, Field and their collaborators mapped information such as average temperature and rainfall and linked it to where each of the bird groups is found today. They used this climatic information to build an ‘ecological niche model’ to map suitable and unsuitable regions for each bird group. They then projected these ecological niche models onto palaeoclimate reconstructions to map potentially-suitable habitats over millions of years.

The researchers were able to predict the geographic occurrences of fossil representatives of these groups at different points in Earth’s history. These fossils provide direct evidence that these groups were formerly distributed in very different parts of the world to where they are presently found.

“We’ve illustrated the extent to which suitable climate has dictated where these groups of animals were in the past, and where they are now,” said Field. “Depending on the predictions of climate change forecasts, this approach may also allow us to estimate where they might end up in the future.”

“Many of these groups don’t contain a large number of living species, but each lineage represents millions of years of unique evolutionary history,” said Saupe. “In the past, climate change happened slowly enough that groups were able to track suitable habitats as these moved around the globe, but now that climate change is occurring at a much faster rate, it could lead to entire branches of the tree of life going extinct in the near future.”

The research was funded in part by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Reference:
Erin Saupe et al. ‘Climatic shifts drove major contractions in avian latitudinal distributions throughout the Cenozoic.’ PNAS (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1903866116

Researchers have shown how millions of years of climate change affected the range and habitat of modern birds, suggesting that many groups of tropical birds may be relatively recent arrivals in their equatorial homes.

Climate has dictated where these groups of animals were in the past, and where they are nowDaniel FieldDaniel J. FieldL-R: Knysna Turaco, Great Blue Turaco, Knysna Turaco


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

‘Get in Cambridge’ social media campaign launches in a bid to attract more students from under-represented backgrounds

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Mon, 06/10/2019 - 15:55

Cambridge announced last week (6 June) that it was making progress on widening access to the university with the proportion of Black and Minority Ethnic students at a record high of 23.5%. However, 2.4% of the undergraduate population in this year’s intake were Black compared with 3.4% of the UK population.

YouTube vlogger Courtney Daniella, herself a Cambridge graduate, presents five films addressing popular misconceptions about Cambridge, offering tips on how to make a successful application and finding out what sixth formers really think about the institution.

The social media campaign Get In Cambridge launched on 10 June with Courtney taking a wry look at Cambridge ‘Myths Versus Reality’, which address untrue assumptions about the university that put students off applying.

The series features 26 films encouraging students from under-represented background to apply. These range from students at schools with low numbers of pupils going on to university, to the UK’s Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities.

When at school, 22-year-old Courtney was told by teachers she was not good enough for Cambridge and struggled to overcome her doubts - one of the main reasons she wanted to give out a different message to students like her.

“I used to tell myself every day that Cambridge wasn’t for a person like me partly because I’d never known anyone who’d gone there, and I’d never seen a black Cambridge student, ever,” she says.

“Now I want to say to anyone who believes that to stop putting yourself and Cambridge in a box and start thinking ‘I have so much that I could bring to this university – it would be great for them to have me.’

“It’s true the gates of Cambridge were once closed to people like me. However, here I am a Cambridge graduate – I’ve done it and people who look like me can see they can do it too.”

In one film, entrepreneur Courtney charts her journey from a North London schoolgirl caring for her mum and working part time to provide for her family, to studying Human, Social, and Political Sciences at Robinson College.

Each of the 26 films features current undergraduates – who all attended state schools - telling the stories of their journeys to Cambridge as they invite cameras into their rooms, libraries, supervision sessions and nights out.

Vloggers are increasingly working with universities to boost such access efforts. Director of the Cambridge Admissions Office Jon Beard said: “While filming the series, at least half a dozen students stopped Courtney on the street to thank her and tell her she was the reason that they were here. It shows what a huge influence they have.

“Admissions statistics released on Thursday show a rise in the number of students who are from state schools, disadvantaged backgrounds, and ethnic minorities. But there is still work to be done in reaching those with the talent and drive to study here who think Cambridge is not for them.

“We hope these films will complement the University and College efforts to widen access, which include a range of initiatives to offer additional academic and financial assistance for students who may have suffered educational disruption or disadvantage.”

Cambridge will continue to work with development programme for black African and Caribbean pupils Target Oxbridge on a range of initiatives including a three-day residential and an additional one-day conference in London, which will take place for the first time this summer.

Grime artist Stormzy launched Cambridge scholarships for Black students last year. Black students starting at Cambridge this October will be able to apply for the next round of Stormzy scholarships when applications open on A-level results day.

A YouTube influencer is fronting a series of films encouraging more black students to apply to Cambridge in the latest push by the University to widen its pool of applicants.

It’s true the gates of Cambridge were once closed to people like me. However, here I am a Cambridge graduate – I’ve done it and people who look like me can see they can do it tooYouTube vlogger and Robinson College alumna Courtney Daniella


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

TOM DICKENS NAMED IN LFE 11 IN RECOGNITION OF ON AND OFF PITCH SUCCESS

Cambridge United News Feed - Mon, 06/10/2019 - 15:42

Academy

Cambridge United scholar Tom Dickens has been named in the LFE 11, acknowledging his success both on the pitch through his football and away from the action academically.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

CAMBRIDGE UNITED FUTSAL TRIALS – BE PART OF THE STORY!

Cambridge United News Feed - Mon, 06/10/2019 - 11:57

Club News

Would you like to be part of the Cambridge United FC Futsal story? It's only just beginning and now is your chance to join the 2019 FA Cup Runners-Up!

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

FIRST CUSP MEETING DATE WITH CLUB CONFIRMED FOR THURSDAY 25TH JULY

Cambridge United News Feed - Mon, 06/10/2019 - 11:04

Club News

Cambridge United can today confirm the Club has agreed the first meeting date with the newly formed Cambridge United Supporters' Panel on Thursday 25th July, 7pm.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

The archive of Professor Sir Robert Edwards, IVF pioneer, reveals his personal struggles: for recognition of an unsung female colleague and fair access to treatment for all

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Mon, 06/10/2019 - 00:01

The private papers of IVF pioneer, Professor Sir Robert Edwards, will open to the public at Cambridge University’s Churchill Archives Centre from Monday 10 June 2019.

Robert Edwards worked for over a decade on the research that led to the success of in vitro fertilisation to treat infertility. The big breakthrough came with the birth of the world’s first IVF baby, Louise Brown in 1978. Thereafter he established the world’s first IVF clinic, Bourn Hall in Cambridgeshire, in 1980. Throughout he worked alongside medical doctor, Patrick Steptoe, and clinical embryologist Jean Purdy. Since then it has been estimated that 6 million babies have been born through IVF all over the world.

Edwards was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2010 for the development of in vitro fertilisation, and was knighted in 2011. Neither award can be made posthumously, so acknowledgment came too late for Purdy and Steptoe who died in 1985 and 1988 respectively - but the discovery was a team effort.

Newly released letters from Edwards’ archive show his personal battle as he repeatedly fought for official recognition of Jean Purdy’s equal contribution towards the discovery of IVF. Her work as a woman in science has gone largely unrecognised when compared to Edwards and Steptoe.

In correspondence released between Edwards and Oldham Health Authority in the lead up to the unveiling of an official plaque to mark the birth of Louise Brown, Edwards argues numerous times for the inclusion of Jean Purdy’s name to sit alongside his own and that of Patrick Steptoe. 

He writes arguing for fair recognition and states that Jean Purdy ‘travelled to Oldham with me for 10 years and contributed as much as I did to the project. Indeed, I regard her as an equal contributor to Patrick Steptoe and myself.’ Unfortunately his repeated appeals fell on deaf ears and Oldham Health Authority did not take on board his request and her name went unrecognised on the official plaque.

Purdy joined Edwards in 1968 and worked closely with him, travelling to California in 1969 to undertake key research on follicular fluid. She continued to be instrumental in enabling the continued trials of IVF and in locating and organizing the adaptation of Bourn Hall as the world’s first IVF clinic. Meanwhile, as letters reveal, the National Health Service repeatedly declined to support IVF work, despite the numerous ways Edwards presented the case.

In a letter dated November 1974, Edwards writes to the Department of Health pointing out, ‘Our major concern is to help the many patients who could benefit by the rapid development of this method, for it could avoid many operations now carried out, which could become unnecessary.’

Again in Oct 1981 he writes to the Local Health Authority questioning the ethics and legality of withholding treatment because of lack of financial support: ‘…these patients have paid their contribution to the NHS and, now they want treatment, they are not being allowed to receive it. I cannot allow this situation to rest as it is, especially since, at long last you have been advised that it is professionally accepted that our approach offers the only hope of conception for some women… I cannot see any excuse for excluding one group of patients from the correct form of treatment.’

Cambridgeshire Health Authority replied to Edwards’ appeals for support, ‘Our current allocation is insufficient to maintain the service that we already provide. There is, therefore, no way in which the Health Authority can meet the expense of NHS patients attending your clinic.’

With the ethics and funding of IVF and other assisted reproductive technologies still open for discussion today - such as the cut in NHS funding for IVF treatment- the Edwards archive could add valuable context to the debate.

The papers will be invaluable for researchers in the history of science, but also in the history of ethics, social implications of medical developments, and political and media history. Edwards engaged with the ethics of IVF and there is a wealth of information in the archive on these matters.

 
The cataloguing of the Edwards' papers has been generously funded by the Wellcome Trust

Sir Robert Edwards' archive catalogue is available online 

Researchers can book an appointment at Churchill Archives Centre to view the papers. 

 

 

Newly released letters from Edwards’ archive show his personal battle as he repeatedly fought for official recognition of Jean Purdy’s equal contribution towards the discovery of IVF. Her work as a woman in science has gone largely unrecognised when compared to Edwards and Steptoe.

Robert Edwards Archive IVF trio with Louise Brown and her mother at 1st Birthday


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Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

CLUB STATEMENT | JUSTIN EDINBURGH

Cambridge United News Feed - Sat, 06/08/2019 - 20:26

Club News

The thoughts of everyone at Cambridge United are with the family and friends of Justin Edinburgh, following the desperately sad news confirmed by Leyton Orient Football Club this evening.

Categories: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Achievements of Cambridge figures recognised in Queen’s Birthday Honours 2019

Cambridge University NewsFeed - Fri, 06/07/2019 - 16:32

King's College Director of Music, Stephen Cleobury, was awarded a Knights Bachelor for his services to choral music.

Dr Cleobury has been Director of Music at the College since 1982. His work at King’s has primarily seen him associated with the Choir of King’s College, and he has played an enormous role in enhancing the reputation of the world-famous choir and developing its activities in broadcasting, touring and recording. 

He has commissioned a great number of new choral works from leading composers, and is known particularly for introducing the now annually commissioned carol at the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols on Christmas Eve.
 
During his time at King’s, Dr Cleobury has worked with many leading orchestras and soloists around the word. He was Chief Conductor of the BBC Singers between 1995 and 2007, he is Chairman of the Incorporated Association of Organists Benevolent Fund, which seeks to support organists and church musicians in need, and he is President of the Friends of Cathedral Music and of the Herbert Howells Society. 
 
He said: “I am profoundly honoured to have received this award. I have sought to nourish and support the precious choral tradition that we have in this country, and to be an advocate for the innumerable benefits of singing and choral music. Nothing I have achieved would have been possible without the outstanding singers with whom I have been so fortunate to work. It has been, truly, a privilege.”

King’s College announced in 2018 that Dr Cleobury would retire in September 2019 after 37 years in post.

The Provost of King’s College, Professor Michael Proctor, said: “The College is delighted and deeply proud that our distinguished Director of Music, Sir Stephen Cleobury, has been recognised in this way.

"In his 37 years in this post, Stephen’s outstanding musicianship has not only maintained and enriched the College’s own international musical reputation, but has made an invaluable contribution to the musical life of the United Kingdom and, indeed, the world.”

Professor Anna Vignoles and Professor Sylvia Richardson have both received a CBE.

Professor Vignoles, who received her CBE for her services to social sciences, holds the 1938 Chair in the Faculty of Education, and is a Fellow of Jesus College. She is also a Fellow of the British Academy and a member of the Economic and Social Research Council.

Her work focuses on the ways in which we can both improve social mobility and ensure that people have the skills they need for the modern labour market. She is known for her work using large scale data to illuminate the very unequal educational and economic outcomes for children growing up in different family circumstances, as well as her research into how well the education system is meeting the needs of both individuals and the wider economy.

Her research has suggested ways to reduce the large socio-economic inequalities in education achievement that we have in the UK.

She said: “I am so grateful for this wonderful honour. It is particularly gratifying to have recognition for the importance of social science research in tackling many of the economic challenges and inequalities that we face today.”

Head of the Faculty of Education, Professor Susan Robertson, said: “This is wonderful recognition of Professor Anna Vignoles’ contribution to our different communities.”

Professor Richardson, who received her CBE for services to medical statistics, is the Director of the MRC Biostatistics Unit and has held a Research Professorship at the University since 2012.

She is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis. Professor Richardson has worked extensively in many areas of biostatistics research and has made important contributions to the statistical modelling of complex biomedical data. Her work has contributed to progress in disease mapping, and her recent research has focused on the modelling and analysis of large data problems such as those arising in genomics.

She said: “I’m extremely delighted and humbled to receive this honour. It means a great deal to me personally, but I believe that this is also an important recognition of the pivotal role that statistics plays in cross-disciplinary endeavors to improve health. The MRC has been a significant funder of my research and I would like to thank them for their continued commitment to the field of biostatistics; support that they have shown for over 100 years since the inception of the MRC Biostatistics Unit in 1913.
 
"I am fortunate to have worked in both France and the UK, over the duration of my career thus far, and I feel that this opportunity to draw from both traditions has allowed me to achieve the recognition in the field of medical statistics for which I am being acknowledged today.”

The achievements and contributions of individuals from the University of Cambridge and its Colleges have been recognised in this year’s Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Nothing I have achieved would have been possible without the outstanding singers with whom I have been so fortunate to work. It has been, truly, a privilegeStephen Cleobury, King's College Director of Music


The text in this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Images, including our videos, are Copyright ©University of Cambridge and licensors/contributors as identified.  All rights reserved. We make our image and video content available in a number of ways – as here, on our main website under its Terms and conditions, and on a range of channels including social media that permit your use and sharing of our content under their respective Terms.

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